Five Things You Can Do For Your Intersex Child

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Georgiann Davis is an intersex person, activist and assistant professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Georgiann has written a great article for The Parents Project on five helpful things that parents can do to support their intersex child.

“Intersex is only one aspect of your child’s life. It might be something that they need your help navigating, or it might be the least of their concerns. They might be bullied at school for something completely unrelated to their intersex trait, and need your help navigating that. They might struggle in math class. They might fall and sprain their ankle at soccer practice. Their needs will vary throughout their life, and might even vary across any given day. What’s important is that you are always listening to their needs and doing whatever it is you can do to assist, support, and love them throughout their lives.”

 

Gender Help for Parents

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Gender Help for Parents

Gender Help for Parents is a website created and maintained by “Australian parents who have struggled to find information about services and support for issues around their children’s gender identity.”

The aim of the website is to make gender identity information easily available for parents and carers. Some good starting pages to have a look at include:

The website also contains information on services for parents and young people in Australia, including services in Tasmania.

First Steps: Shared Stories from Parents and Caregivers of Trans* and Gender Diverse Children

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First Steps is a collection of personal stories, information and tips written for and by parents and caregivers of Trans* and gender diverse children. Published by Working It Out and the Gender Centre NSW, the booklet includes five stories from parents and a young person about their experiences, a note a about language and and gender identity, links to useful books and resources for talking about gender identity with children, and information about Working It Out support groups for parents, young people and adults in Tasmania.

First Steps was made possible with the generous assistance of many parents and families, the Gender Centre NSW and, Being Proud, a project of Working It Out, initially funded by the Tasmanian Government Department of Premier and Cabinet LGBTI Community Grants program 2014.

Download First Steps [PDF] | [DOC]

Being Me (ABC Four Corners)

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Being Me was a Four Corners documentary that originally aired on the ABC in November 2014. This critically acclaimed documentary explores the stories of several trans* children and their families.

View the episode free on the ABC Four Corners website.

“There are any number of self help books that will tell you how to find yourself.

But what if truly being yourself involved changing your gender? Would you have the courage to do it?

Eleven-year-old Isabelle does. To the world she looked like a young boy. But she knew that she was really a girl, and a year ago she told her parents the way she felt.

This week Four Corners reporter Janine Cohen tells Isabelle’s story and the story of the family, the doctor and ultimately the community that backed her decision to truly be herself.

Along the way we meet other people who’ve confronted the same feelings and discover that a growing and significant number of children are finding themselves in the same situation. Some find support from their parents and doctors. Others discover fear, prejudice and a legal system that doesn’t make it easy for them to be themselves.

For Isabelle, the decision to tell her story was not made lightly. She and her parents tell Four Corners that they are willing to speak about their experience so that others won’t feel alone and other transgender children can be helped and protected.

Doctors tell the program that trying to repress the feeling that you are trapped in the wrong body simply does not work. Instead, it can lead to self harm and even suicide.

Paediatricians also make it clear that timing is important. They explain that if children want to make a physical change, then treatment should begin at puberty. In that way, hormone treatments can be prescribed with far better results.

A senior judge tells Four Corners she is keen to see the law relating to transgender treatment tested sooner rather than later.

Meanwhile, doctors and families warn the current legal situation is putting some children at risk.

Isabelle’s story is remarkable and inevitably raises many questions for families, doctors and society in general. Ultimately though, it’s a journey that shows courage and honesty is essential to triumph over ignorance. It’s a story that is not to be missed.”

The Gender Centre

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The Gender Centre, NSW

The Gender Centre offers a wide range of services to transgender and gender diverse people, their partners, families and friends in New South Wales. It includes links to current news items related to issues around gender diversity, and a range of fact sheets. They also publish the quarterly magazine Polare, and have an archive containing articles from all past issues. The resources published by the Gender Centre are also relevant to people outside of New South Wales.

 

Monash Gender Clinic

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Monash Gender Dysphoria Clinic (http://www.monashhealth.org/page/gender_dysophoria)

This website provides a summary of the services provided by the Monash Gender Dysphoria Clinic based in Melbourne. It also provides a clear description of what is meant by ‘gender dysphoria’.

About The Clinic

“The Gender Dysphoria Clinic is part of the Monash Health network, in Melbourne, Victoria Australia. It also has links with the Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine. The clinic is the only government-funded clinic of its kind in Australia, and it also receives referrals from neighbouring States. The clinic aims to provide an assessment and treatment service for patients experiencing Gender Dysphoria.
The clinic’s primary client-base are those patients who have a strong and persistent wish to live as their non-birth-assigned gender, as well as a desire to make their body as congruent as possible with their affirmed gender. The clinic assesses patients and, where appropriate, assists them with the “transition process” from one gender to another, often through various gender reassignment steps including psychotherapy, hormone therapy and surgery.
The clinic has several permanent part-time staff members, as well as several clinical associates. All clinical staff, including associates, meet regularly in order to evaluate the progress of patients.
Procedures within the clinic are consistent with the Standards of Care guidelines published by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and endorsed by ANZPATH (Australian and New Zealand Professional Association for Transgender Health – www.anzpath.org).”

Transcend

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Transcend

Transcend is an online information hub for parents and families of transgender children. It was founded by parents who felt clear and concise information would help others access appropriate support for their transgender children. Has a range of information including legal, articles, books, news and family stories.

 

Guidelines for Supporting Sexual and Gender Diversity in Schools and Colleges

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Guidelines for Supporting Sexual and Gender Diversity in Schools and Colleges, produced by the Tasmanian Government Department of Education, provides guidelines for Tasmanian schools to enable them to be inclusive of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students, families and staff. The guidelines include information regarding legislation, research, providing a supportive school culture, and how schools will be measured on their improvement.

Visit the website: Tasmanian Government Department of Education

Download the Guidelines for Supporting Sexual and Gender Diversity in Schools and Colleges [PDF]

 

Growing Up Queer

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Growing Up Queer was a national research study released in 2014 looking into the issues facing young Australians who are gender variant and sexuality diverse. It demonstrates the need for greater community education, training of educators, doctors and health professionals about the health and wellbeing issues facing young Australians who are gender variant and sexuality diverse.

Visit Growing Up Queer

Download Growing Up Queer research report (2014) [PDF]

 

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